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Comments

  • clayjohnson

    clayjohnson

    March 11, 2015, 5:53 am

    My intent wasn't to be snarky. I read your comment wrong, and thought you were confusing the two (something a lot of people do, you must admit). So your problem comes down to: what do people do who can't afford health-related bills.

    The general answer to that is something must be done, but not using the state — especially not the federal government. Allow for charities to provide goods and services to the poor. If you think these organizations are ineffective, then do something non-violent about it.

    Reply

  • producer35

    producer35

    March 10, 2015, 11:01 am

    Give Obama credit for taking on the big problems square on. If you go after the global economy, US health care, Iran and North Korea nukes, Middle East unrest, climate change, big business ineptitude, two wars you didn't start, and then add on a shot at the Olympics there is a fair chance everything won't work out just the way you'd like it to.

    To not attempt something 100% guarantees failure. At least he's not shrinking from the task and he's giving it his best shot even with all the political sniping he's taking. I'd like to see what he could do if even a portion of his political foes stopped trying to solely knock Obama down and started rallying behind our President to get things done.

    Reply

  • deprecated

    deprecated

    March 10, 2015, 6:23 pm

    When "ongoing developments and upcoming technologies" are deployed to the user base, than "using the internet" should bear witness to them. I am "using the internet." I have not seen anything really interesting happen in the last 10 years or so, at least not nearly interesting as they should be for 10 years worth of development.

    If you know of something interesting coming down the pipe, by all means, educate me!

    But you have not really said anything yet. Other than to tell me I don't know what I'm talking about because I only use the internet, so I must not know what using the internet is.

    ??

    Reply

  • WhoKilledTeddyBear

    WhoKilledTeddyBear

    March 10, 2015, 4:48 pm

    It's called hypocrisy. Our government has a bias when it comes to the two countries. Always leveling accusations towards Iran and none towards Israel. Israel has everything to do with a nuclear Iran, because Israel wants to be the only one that is nuclear and is the other constant accuser of Iran. Meanwhile the U.S. is giving Israel a pass, not leveling sanctions against them, demanding their facilities be inspected or making them sign the NPT. Obama's dealings with Iran aren't naive, his rhetoric has been the same as Bush's. He knows exactly what he is doing.

    Reply

  • taw

    taw

    March 11, 2015, 5:21 am

    It is constant time, as key length was specified to be independent of message length.

    Assume you can brute force private key out of public key for message of size n=1 in x steps. Then for any message size n, you can brute force private key out of public key in the same x steps.

    Asymptotically the brute forcing is going to negligible part of the algorithm runtime, and almost all the time will be spent actually signing the message with broken key. That will take many orders of magnitude more time than our universe lasts, but it doesn't make it any less true.

    Reply

  • selthera

    selthera

    March 10, 2015, 9:49 pm

    I would love it if more cops came to Reddit and responded to these brutality stories. Surely there are police officers who see the events happening around America and want to express their feelings on the matter. I think it would help the overall perception of the police force and give them the credit they deserve.

    We all know they are not ALL bad, and the ones who are good, who do their best to serve the public trust, these are the ones who should stand up, because eventually once enough stand up, that blue wall of silence won't be enough.

    Reply

  • LDM

    LDM

    March 10, 2015, 11:45 am

    Because I'm more into albums than artists, I recommend you check out:

    * *Done by the Forces of Nature* - Jungle Brothers

    * *Midnight Marauders* - A Tribe Called Quest

    * *Buhloone Mindstate* - De La Soul

    * *The Score* - Fugees

    * *Mos Def and Talib Kweli Are Black Star* - Black Star

    * *Like Water for Chocolate* - Common

    * *Party Music* - The Coup

    * *Lucy Ford: The Atmosphere EPs* - Atmosphere

    * *Talkin' Honky Blues* - Buck 65 (a little weird)

    * *Rising Down* - The Roots

    A lot of conscious/alternative hip-hop suffers from a sort of smarter-than-you pretension-- especially in the case of Talib Kweli; his collaborative material is much better than his solo stuff, IMO. This is a problem in indie music, too. But when you find the gems, you begin to understand just how unappreciated hip hop is as a means of musical expression.

    Reply

  • 321

    321

    March 11, 2015, 2:00 am

    :)

    seriously though, i think the fact that internally he did not really believe he would win the fight (due to the other guy not being frightened of him) meant that he did not duck as quickly as he could have, and did not fight as well as he would have, because his subconscious knew that the best strategy, having got into a fight he didn't think he could win, was for it to be over as quickly as possible, so it forced him to let himself get beaten. the more defence he had put up, the longer the fight would have gone on, and the worse his injuries would have been when he eventually lost anyway, and the reason he would have lost anyway was because he didn't really believe he could win, and the other guy could see that. they both subconsciously knew how it would go. the aggressive guy really did NOT want a fight at all, what he wanted was to get the guy at the door to back down. that is what he was trying to do, he was banking on the guy at the door not wanting to have a fight, he was trying to bully him into giving way without a fight. but the guy at the door luckily didn't let himself be bullied, and forced the physical fight.

    Reply

  • frenchmermaid

    frenchmermaid

    March 10, 2015, 1:01 pm

    I read this really ridiculous book called "You are Becoming a Galactic Human". I don't remember how I got it, or why.

    In the book, the author talked to Aliens who told him/her (can't remember the gender of the nut) that the earth was going to pass through a "Photon Belt" and that scientists didn't really know what Photons were, and that when it happened, electronics would be rendered obsolete and our DNA would have 12 helices.. Also that black people had some lizard-alient DNA, and of course, white people can from the "good aliens". I believe they called them Serians.

    It was fucking nuts, but it was also talking about the year 1996.

    Reply

  • baddspellar

    baddspellar

    March 11, 2015, 2:21 am

    Maybe your friend has never known a religious computer scientist because most programmers are respectful enough of others' religious beliefs not proselytize at work, and are not the type to divulge too many personal details on the job.

    I am Catholic, and very active in the religious education and youth ministry programs in my parish. I don't believe I have ever even mentioned this in passing at work, as it's really nobody else's business. I also have a PhD in computer engineering.

    The only way I have ever known that employees of mine are religious is when they have ask for some minor considerations to accommodate their religious beliefs (like working from home a little extra during Ramadan, leaving before sunset on Fridays, or saying they're not available to be on-call on Sunday mornings)

    Reply

  • bobcat

    bobcat

    March 11, 2015, 2:57 am

    I assume you had no $100 bills in your possesion when you walked into the first bank:

    File a claim in small claims court. Do it IMMEDIATELY.

    If they do not show up, you win. They can't even use a lawyer there - the manager will have to defend.

    If they DO show up - it's your word against theirs. You are a poor college student not likely to have had ANY $100 bills before cashing the check - they see thousnads of them per day. You are more likely to be telling the truth, which is what the judge will go by. That 'log' bullshit is one more fact in your favor.

    Reply

  • mattv9782

    mattv9782

    March 10, 2015, 1:13 pm

    The last act of any corrupt government is to loot the treasury before fleeing, and that is exactly what bush and his buddies on Wall St. did before the neocon regime fell. Bush's Fox News viewing supporters-in-denial were in such disbelief, they were willing to believe any excuse he had to give them. Uncreatively, he told them to blame minorities, as usual, and to not look in the direction of the big banks who to this day are awarding themselves billions in bonuses even as waves of foreclosures take place in states red and blue.

    Reply

  • Justavian

    Justavian

    March 10, 2015, 7:35 am

    Don't hold your breath. I get the feeling that most people who talk about concrete historical evidence for the tenets of their religion have never investigated on their own. They're told by authority figures that the tenets are absolutely facts, and vaguely told there is historical evidence (look, the bible says so, and the bible is an accurate historical document). I think they'll be disappointed to do a little digging and find that there's no extrabiblical (or generally extra-holy-text in the case of other religions) evidence for anything claimed. And the only accounts we have at all can be regarded as non-eye witness hearsay.

    It gets worse, of course - even if we *did* have multiple contemporary eye witness accounts of ancient miracles, that still wouldn't provide sufficient evidence to believe that these events actually occurred. There are literally thousands of living eye witnesses who will say that Sathya Sai Baba has raised people from the dead, read minds, foretold the future, etc.

    Sorry, i realize this is a rant for another thread...

    Reply

  • degriz

    degriz

    March 10, 2015, 10:26 pm

    "Dear member of staff,

    If you are the parent of a child between 6 months and 12 years of age, I would very much like to offer you the opportunity of enrolling your child in a clinical trial comparing the two available paediatric swine ‘flu vaccines. This study is funded by the Department of Health and the National Institute of Health Research, UK.

    We will be enrolling children at the outpatients’ department of the Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and if you would like more information about the study and the vaccines involved please click on the link below:

    www.swineflutrial.org

    If you require further information please contact the Bristol Children’s Vaccine Group on 0117 3420699.

    Yours sincerely,"

    Reply

  • truco

    truco

    March 10, 2015, 9:34 am

    One of the central issues leading to the civil war was the debate over the expansion of slavery. Right before the war most in the north were fine with slavery remaining in the states that already had slaves. I don't know then that the south decided to secede because the north was threatening to take away their slaves immediately and thereby severely cripple their economy. It seems to me that it was caused by an unwillingness to change. You may be right that it was specifically the elite landowner's unwillingness to change that led to eventual secession, because the economy of the south was inextricably tied to them, but I think that underestimates the cultural component. Yes, obviously the north had some pro-slavery individuals (particularly large business owners who feared secession and wanted to maintain business relationships) and the south had some more tolerant individuals. But if the majority in the north were willing to allow the south to retain their slaves in the states where slavery was already legal (at least for then), it seems to me that culture more likely informed people's eventual support of secession than economics. Perhaps it didn't even have to do with racism, but the principle of the north attempting to impose its own values onto them. But I don't see the threat of economic failure being the reason people decided to secede if the majority of the north only opposed the expansion, not the retaining, of slavery.

    Reply

  • scottklarr

    scottklarr

    March 10, 2015, 6:22 pm

    I have been experimenting trying to perfect a spanish rice recipe (according to my taste, not authenticity). So far the best batch has been:

    * 2 cups jasmine rice

    * 3.25 cups water

    * Three chicken bullion cubes

    * Medium onion diced

    * 1/4 cup or so green onion chopped

    * 2 tbsp taco seasoning

    * 1 tbsp olive oil

    * 1 tsp garlic powder

    * 8oz can tomato sauce

    ----

    1. Heat up a frying pan to mid-high temp, add olive oil and rice. *Constantly* stir until the rice is browned, almost to the point of burning (make suire you use a wooden or metal utensil to stir... I found that plastic does not like to be in high heat for as long as you have to stir....)

    2. A few minutes before the rice is browned, add in the onion.

    3. While this is going on, have a pot with near boiling water ready with the bullion already dissolved. Once the rice is done browning, add all the ingredients into the pot including rice/onion. Bring to a boil then set to simmer and let it cook until the rice is as tender as you want.. stir it frequently and keep it covered when not stirring so the water doesn't evaporate.

    About 250 calories per cup. Makes about 6 cups.

    I found that this rice is really good if you have a 1/2 cup of it with a couple cups of shredded lettuce (and either 2 tbsp of Cesaer dressing, or half a cup of salsa).

    Reply

  • necrosis

    necrosis

    March 10, 2015, 8:11 pm

    > Seems to me they are saying you can't change the concentration of wealth because it's a "natural" outcome of networks. To which I say...pshaw.

    No, they're not saying that. They are saying (indirectly) that you can't persistently/consistently change the concentration of wealth without changing the structure of the network. Government redistribution acts as a supernode within a network.

    Then you'd have to model the costs of running that supernode (over the network), and the new network dynamics, and see if the entire pie grows or shrinks ... and you might even be able to test such things as finding situations under which "a rising tide" raises all ships.

    Finally, they do say you can probably change the blend of wealth concentration ... but not know a-priori the systemic cost.

    It seems to me as if you are saying that the concentration of wealth is a bad thing. I personally think that wealth has long been concentrated (where there was enough to matter) ... but that the situation of the poorest amongst us, and then the average citizen in terms of basic necessities and quality of life to be more important than some ratio between the richest and poorest.

    Reply

  • winterorange

    winterorange

    March 10, 2015, 8:24 am

    A theoretical physicist, human cloning, or nanotechnology expert would be nice.

    I realize that these people probably have much more important things to do than to answer ridiculous questions from people like me. However, I'm in the planning stages of a sci-fi comic which deals with scientific concepts well out of my league...and I would really love to bounce certain ideas off of an expert so that I can represent the science as accurately as possible. There's a limit to how much a layman like myself can truly understand by googling and reading wikipedia articles.

    Reply

  • Freeky

    Freeky

    March 11, 2015, 3:19 am

    In my experience, they normally need some significant abuse to start falling apart like that. I actually have some library mass-market paperbacks, and generally the backs are just a bit bent; the worst ones with pages actually falling out have clearly been abused - the cover torn, taking part of the binding with it, or pages bent fully open and flattened repeatedly.

    Not once have I seen a paperback fall to bits having been read once or twice, though. Either your father was really mean to his books, or the people who bind your mass market paperbacks must be really mean to you :)

    Maybe I should get some mass market paperbacks from the US so I can see what the binding's like compared to ours.

    Reply

  • cantCme

    cantCme

    March 10, 2015, 4:25 pm

    This is indeed why I do it. Believe Win95 needed you to press apply for anything for the changes to apply. I wasn't that old when I played around with win95 (mostly the awesome pinball game that came with it) so it is possible I remember incorrectly.

    Now that I think of it, it is also possible that my father taught me that when I was younger.

    And it is a pretty good habit if you ask me. In my opinion the extra click is totally worth it when you run into a program or something that actually does require you do press apply first.

    Reply

  • syuk

    syuk

    March 10, 2015, 8:33 pm

    thats the problem in this kind of estate, and I can kind of guess why the homeowner reacts the way he did - he's seen this shit before and knows that any retaliation to what he does will be by cowardly teens smashing his shit up for him.

    A lot of decent people live in estates like this, but there are many more 'chavs' - I lived in several areas where a show of force would be met with undefendable response (late at night shit, lies, false reports for fun), I took the line of pretending to be just like them but never doing anything. Heh, when we moved out I made a few enemies.

    Reply

  • bonzinip

    bonzinip

    March 10, 2015, 9:09 pm

    Many are not hyperbolic:

    * there are now hundreds of thousands of pa-tents on abstract subject matter -> true

    * Software products are often highly complex, created by combining hundreds or thousands of discrete (and potentially novel) elements in a cumulative process -> think "files"

    * the existence of tens of thousands of applications that for eighteen months after filing are unpublished. -> true

    * Major software products are complex, involving many thousands or even millions of lines of code and many different components -> true

    The redundancy is there, but it is an explanation to people that know nil about software development processes.

    Reply

  • Kerguidou

    Kerguidou

    March 11, 2015, 3:50 am

    As a Canadian, I agree with this mooglor. That being said, the grandparent's post does have a point but not the one it thinks it does. I speak a few languages: english and french as a kid, spanish later on and I picked up more recently italian. A serious problem of learning english here in Canada and many other english speaking countries is that formal structure and grammar is never taught before college. In french, spanish and italian, it is learnt from elementary school.

    In conclusion, I am wondering if there is even less of that formal grammar being taught in the UK than in other english speaking nations.

    edit: Yes, I know that they are comparing to non native speakers in the article.

    Reply

  • ssylvan

    ssylvan

    March 11, 2015, 2:09 am

    It's the best solution *by accident*. It's not a good language that does systems programming *well*. It's a language that happens to be well positioned due to historical accidents, and therefore has a lot of compilers, libraries and people experienced with it. So sure, if I was writing an embedded app, C is most likely what I would use, but that doesn't mean that C is a good language for the job at hand, merely that it's cornered the market due to first-mover advantage and quite a lot of sheer luck (e.g. Unix caught on).

    Honestly, you could take the lessons we've learned in the last 40 years and come up with a *much* better systems programming language than C. There is no reason why, say, arrays need to be horribly broken because you're doing systems programming. You can have a language that gives you low-level bit-fiddling tools without being such a *mess*. Unfortunately is so massively well positioned that it would be extremely hard, if not impossible, to displace it, and as a result there really aren't any alternatives other than maybe Ada or something. But then again, maybe we should just add low-level access to high level languages rather than have special languages for systems...

    C was a medium-term solution intended to be a shallow abstraction of the PDP-11 microprocessor and was *never* intended to be used for decades to come - even for systems programming.

    Reply

  • blindbug

    blindbug

    March 10, 2015, 7:46 am

    I hear this from time to time, and on the outside I can see where the 'Walk for a Cure' seems so stupid. But, what it does is pool the resources of teams together to collectively raise more money for donation. Take for example myself, where I was the captain of a Cancer Society Relay for Life team this year. As a team, I had around 12-15 people who were still in college or just graduating. Individually, we donated less than $400... but collectively under the guise of the Relay, we raised a little over $2500. The Relay counted for almost $500 of that money, and was raised in just a few hours. It may seem silly to you, but I can atest to the fact that walks/relays DO help raise funds and awareness for organizations.

    Reply

  • tuzemi

    tuzemi

    March 11, 2015, 8:30 am

    > If you are letting your employees do analysis with excel macros you are fucked. You may not even realize it but you are fucked.

    Sadly, I work at such a company, and they are NOT fucked because their bread and butter is manufacturing Real Stuff. They've only got about 3000 folks with computers to do the office parts for the other 10000 folks in the manufacturing areas. They absolutely will not allow non-Windows platforms in ANY office or backoffice role. The ONLY non-Windows platforms in the company are the PLC and DCS control systems in the manufacturing areas. (This materially affects me because I want to introduce Big Iron computational modeling into our optimization efforts, stuff that requires 16+ cores and will never run on a non-Unix platform.)

    Excel is 95% of their tools, the other 5% being Access. Trying to convert their Excel+VBA messes into cleaner Access databases (that could be the model to turn into a Web-based CRUD application later) is often met with the line, "That's great, but what if you're transferred somewhere else? Who will maintain this new tool? We're doing OK today with Excel, let's not change it unless we really have to."

    If their business wasn't manufacturing but was rather consulting or analysis or something else brain-heavy, I'd agree with you: having so much stuff in Excel would eventually seriously hurt the company. But the manufacturing can continue without the office staff, it just wouldn't be quite as optimal. Everyone else I know in manufacturing companies has the same story: Excel rules the roost.

    Reply

  • shevegen

    shevegen

    March 11, 2015, 3:15 am

    This is a logic which leads to things that we have - DNA that is patented.

    And DNA is nothing else than plain information. Once a gene is transcribed, the cell basically *must* translate this mRNA copy into proteins if this mRNA reaches a Ribosome. If you can patent DNA sequences, you control biological complexity. It does not matter who had the origin (i.e. if you found this biological information in "nature" or if you created it yourself as assembly platform), and the moment companies can control key biological information is the moment where they will exert their control about it against everyone else.

    This way, anyone who wants to use this information needs to pay up to the company owner. And I am sorry to say but I believe that information like this should be free.

    Software patents are a somewhat similar issue, although not as deeply rooted as biological information (we humans consist of biological information too). I am fine with software patents that really DRIVE innovation, but in many situations they are merely a strategic tool.

    Big Companies will however deny this fact, no matter how many lawsuits they fight. Why? Because it suits them just fine. It gives them control, and having control means having power.

    I guarantee that politicans will not change this system effectively.

    Reply

  • Torlen

    Torlen

    March 10, 2015, 7:01 pm

    Bopping headcrabs isn't what makes HL2 brilliant. Hell, the game is 6 years old and could still pass as a newish game even now. Graphics, story, everything. I'm making myself seem like a huge fanboy, but I truly believe the HL2 series to be as close to a perfect game as I could imagine.

    Of course, this is all my opinion. I'll bet there are people out there that feel the exact opposite as me.

    *EDIT*

    I almost forgot to comment on Thief 3. I played the first and second one and never realized until now that the 3rd was out. Once I finish reading up on Deus Ex and Bioshock I'll research this one next.

    Reply

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