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Comments

  • MadAce

    MadAce

    March 11, 2015, 3:36 am

    What an exciting idea. I think Sci-Fi is often viewed as a kind of childish and unworthy form of story-telling. While in my opinion it sometimes tackles issues other genres don't even look at.

    I browsed my movie collection and here's a few you could show:

    Children of Men: Great movie overall. Action-adventure but with a unique setting due to the cool background story.

    A Scanner Darkly: Philip K. Dick was probably one of the best sci-fi writers of all time. Hence there are a lot of movies made after his stories. IMHO A Scanner Darkly is one of the best PKD movies ever made.

    Starship Troopers: The reason why I like this movie is perhaps not really a reason to watch it in its entirety. Reason: Is the world the characters live in a Utopia or a Dystopia?

    12 Monkeys: Overall awesome.

    The Man From Earth: Quite a lot of talking actually. In fact, nothing but talking. It's actually too boring for your students. But I love it.

    Unbreakable: I'm not even sure this is Sci-Fi. But it's the best superhero movie ever.

    Pitch Black: A modern time version of alien. So less cheesy sfx while still having the main themes.

    Mars Attacks: Hilarious and IMO quite good to see what are them old sci-fi cliché's.

    The Matrix: Seriously. Even tho it might be a rip-off of a whole lot of things, it's still a great introduction to the "everything's virtual" theme. In fact, the 2 sequels, although not as magically good, deepen the themes and ideas of the movie enough to allow a viewing IMO.

    Have you considered showing a star trek Episode? Some of them are quite good examples of what is interesting and good sci fi. (while others are immense crap)

    If you need any advice or whatever, contact me. I'm quite a big sci-fi fan, both of movies and the written story. Oh, and not a nerd. Imagine that.

    Reply

  • mollymoo

    mollymoo

    March 10, 2015, 7:22 pm

    Are you reading the right figure for its RAM usage? You don't say what OS you're using, but there are usually two figures. One is how much RAM it's actually using, the other is how much it has mapped. An application can have a hell of a lot more mapped than it's actually using.

    Firefox has been running for 25 days on this machine (running OS 10.5) and it's currently using 227 MB of RAM, but "Virtual Memory" is at 1.42 GB. That's not real RAM usage, or paged out to disk, it's just an artefact of the way memory is managed and used.

    I don't have an XP or Vista box to hand and I can't remember what they call the two types. In Windows 7 it's Private and Working Set, with Private being how much RAM it's actually using. In Linux it's Virtual and Resident, with Resident being the real usage.

    Reply

  • Cogeno

    Cogeno

    March 10, 2015, 6:38 am

    I hate it. I am really glad that the STO (Gatineau, QC's transit system) has started cracking down on it. First, you'll get a warning. Then, if a supervisor gets called, you'll get slammed with a large fine. Do it again, then you pay double whatever it was.

    > SECTION 12 GOOD CITIZENSHIP

    > On buses and property of the Société, no person shall:

    ...

    > 12.10 Shout or talk very loudly so as to disturb other riders on a bus or property, namely when using

    cell phones.

    -----

    > 21.3 Any person who contravenes any one of the provisions of this By-law commits a violation and is

    liable to a fine of at least one hundred dollars ($100), but no more than five hundred dollars

    ($500), exclusive of costs.

    Any person who contravenes the same provision of the By-law again within 12 months of the

    first violation shall be liable to a penalty of at least two hundred dollars ($200), but no more

    than one thousand dollars ($1000), exclusive of costs.

    Reply

  • Phrag

    Phrag

    March 10, 2015, 3:58 pm

    So your problem is that the people who were colonized ask for apologies too often and they are not deserved because there is the possibility that it could have been worse if someone else colonized them... That's not really a reason for the government not to apologize for the things that were wrong. I can't exactly go and punch someone in the face and then be indignant when they get upset because of the possibility that someone else could have hit them harder. Also when you are trying to form relations with a country that was a former colony, it works better to apologize for the wrongs that were done the past rather than ignore them.

    I also wouldn't call mass-murder, torture, and internment camps 'enlightened' for the 1950's.

    Lots of people are owed apologies and more from the US government and I don't feel bad because I've never been a part of it outside of voting and paying taxes.

    Reply

  • leimy

    leimy

    March 10, 2015, 12:49 pm

    Heh, C and C++ are great for some stuff. I'd argue if you're reaching for C++ you're better off with pretty much any language other than it for what your problem space is though. C is good enough for a lot of the things C++ is low level enough for. For languages that need a higher order of design, C++ gets a lot of stuff right, but the syntax is so bad you should use something else.

    That's my opinion anyway. There's lots of something else's out there to choose from in imperative and functional programming.

    Reply

  • soomprimal

    soomprimal

    March 10, 2015, 8:56 am

    "A martial artist would likely have to train for many years to be capable of mushin."

    Cool article- I never knew about this concept even though I've trained in martial arts. But after reading about it, I realized that I've experienced this lucid zen like feeling before simply sparring. It wasn't for a prolonged period of time, but sometime you just "feel" the flow of the combat and move intuitively. It's an amazing feeling.

    Mushin must be a continued state of this feeling without the ego reaction to those who first feel it.

    Reply

  • snowpup

    snowpup

    March 11, 2015, 7:59 am

    >Paris also has a sense of romanticism about it that is hard to beat.

    I just got back from Paris on a business trip, so my experience is obviously limited, but this is not really true. This notion of Paris being a romantic city is just in people's heads, maybe created by the movies and perpetuated by America's isolated nature. The first thing I noticed about Paris? It's dirty: trash, cigarette butts, bums, gum, etc. are everywhere, just like any other city. Some guy asked me (in French, so at least it was sexy) for money before I even left the airport. The subway smelled. When I suggested to the people actually from Paris that is was a romantic city, they thought that was funny and silly of me to say.

    NOT saying it is a bad city, just saying it is really no better or worse than any other crowded city.

    Reply

  • IlSerpenteDiGaleno

    IlSerpenteDiGaleno

    March 11, 2015, 12:13 am

    I 'curanderos', i medici stregoni dell'altra parte del mondo, possono insegnare qualcosa ai nostri medici tradizionali?

    Ormai molti dei nostri, specialisti nelle singole malattie, somigliano più ad operai specializzati nella 'fabbrica' ospedale o a burocrati amministrativi e tecnologici sommersi da dati, statistiche e circolari.

    E' la considerazione completamente diversa del malato, che è prima di tutto un essere umano, l'aspetto che possiamo importare: il 'curandero' non cura la malattia, ma tutto il corpo e la mente.

    L'eccesso di tecnologia e burocrazia sottrae tempo utile per 'guardare negli occhi il paziente', distraendo il medico stesso dal contatto col malato, afferma Aldo Lo Curto, medico di famiglia, specializzato in Chirurgia riparatrice, ma anche medico itinerante, volontario in Amazzonia, Benin, India e Madagascar.

    La necessità di umanizzare la medicina è un salvagente necessario nel gran mare dell'applicazione terapeutica, razionale ed oggettiva.

    Reply

  • gustoreddit51

    gustoreddit51

    March 10, 2015, 2:29 pm

    The next best car which was extremely reliable was a Toyota Corrola.

    I never buy a new car, always used cars. I make sure the engine is stone cold, get in, do one full press on the accelerator & release, put the key in and turn. If it immediately springs to life with barely a crank, it's a good sign. I started also screening potential candidates from Consumer Reports' repair records data bank. You have to have a paid subscription but it's definitely worth it even for just one purchase

    Reply

  • shockfactor

    shockfactor

    March 11, 2015, 9:14 am

    "The narwhal bacons at midnight"

    "And then she said that it was too wide and left"

    "Hey carl, where'd you hide the body?"

    "What was that link to that site with the dead stuff, again? I'm horny."

    "So I heard you were into bondage"

    "Tomorrow check under your chair, but be careful"

    "They are lying to you. Don't be fooled"

    "You're doing great. Keep pretending to be one of them. Soon our plan can be put in motion and this planet can be ours"

    "Initiate protocol 84-Z"

    They're all somewhat offputting.

    Reply

  • jemka

    jemka

    March 11, 2015, 9:10 am

    There's a fine line between laymen-use tools and advanced-use tools. CMS like any software product can be designed more for the laymen to use. Increased usability usually means reduced flexibility (think everything being customizable in the backend; pages, themes, fonts, and colors). However, software can also be designed more for the advanced/admin type user. These people know their way around will want more flexibility, which generally increases the learning curve and introduces advanced subjects like templating and module editing. Of course there is a lot in between, but unfortunately you rarely get both sides in one product, FOR FREE.

    Reply

  • allenizabeth

    allenizabeth

    March 11, 2015, 1:17 am

    >because of the possibility that someone else could have hit them harder.

    What possibility? This is pretty much certain.

    >I also wouldn't call mass-murder, torture, and internment camps 'enlightened' for the 1950's.

    I admit that the era of de-colonization was pretty bloody. But in my opinion the golden era of the British Empire was already over. These were the actions of an empire in decline, and the process of letting go of the colonies was poorly handled in most cases. Doesn't mean that you can denounce all the British in Kenya, but it was certainly a case of bad management.

    Reply

  • shuael

    shuael

    March 11, 2015, 2:11 am

    What do you hope to achieve from this "survey"? After collection of your data, can you arrive at _any_ conclusion at all?

    Even on the odd chance that your survey found that 100% of programmers are so-called atheists, you cannot conclude that all programmers are atheists.

    Apart from finding comfort in numbers (an unscientific count of comments here would indicate you have many programmers that are "atheists"), what purpose does this post serve?

    What does this have to do with a *programming* subreddit?

    Reply

  • flavor8

    flavor8

    March 10, 2015, 1:35 pm

    Thanks. The discussion below is interesting and I'll refer to it.

    You say that the purpose of patenting software is the goal of fostering creativity by protecting intellectual property. I say that copyright can do a good job of that:

    Software is relatively cheap to produce (compared to, say, prescription drugs - on which limited patents seem reasonable, given the multi hundreds of millions spent to develop these inventions.) With enough time, a couple guys in a garage can produce software that is the equal to the efforts of a large corporation, and probably a good deal more efficiently. If we're talking about closed source software, then those guys have either had to break copyright by reverse engineering (e.g. decompiling) their competitor's software, and lifting whole sections of it, or they wrote their own alternative. If their software looks identical to their competitor's, assuming that it is specialized enough, then again they run the risk of breaching copyright. So far, so good (for copyright). But what about the _idea_ of the software?

    One angle of argument is that software is essentially automating a series of actions that a human could do. So, clearly, you cannot be too general about the idea that is patentable. ("A series of steps to produce a formatted document", or "tabulation of numbers using a 2 dimensional worksheet".)

    However, I think that most people would agree that the next level of specificity shouldn't be patentable either. E.g. imagine if somebody had a patent on "the spreadsheet" or "a word processor", or a legalese alternative to these. This would be analagous to patenting "the car" or "the toaster" in the real world; clearly there's a ton of room for innovation within the confines of the basic abstract idea, and by preventing competitors from trying to reproduce the idea you're dampening creativity and competition in the marketplace. And, the more specialized you get in the overall purpose of the software, the more easily copyrightable the overall idea of the software is (since the more identifiable the idea is as a basic component of the application itself.)

    OK, so let's focus further. What about a patent on some user interface innovation? Well, what if xerox had patented "applications are presented in a 2 dimensional box which can be moved around the screen by means of a cursor", or if Engelbart had invented "a hardware device which by moving it allows a cursor on screen to move, and by clicking one of the buttons allows an action on screen at the position of the cursor to occur." Patents on either of these would possibly have set back the desktop computing industry by years. Actually, that's deliberately misleading: Engelbart _did_ have a patent which he never benefited from, because it expired before commercial systems came out using his invention - was he a decade or two too early, or did his patent stifle commercial experimentation with his idea? It's conceivable that Jobs and Wozniak would have gone with a different paradigm rather than pay royalties on the mouse, given their humble beginnings, had the patent still been in play. So now, clearly, we're in murky territory.

    I think the thing about software patents that most software people object to is that innovations in software are generally _ideas_ which can be built upon, and which usually are subtle variations on prior work. The system is notoriously easy to abuse. The speed of innovation within the industry is totally counter to the traditional length of patents. We have a thriving non-commercial sector in the industry.

    Take Mosaic and Napster for example. Both were specialized and paradigm shifting; had either had a patent (neither did) then alternative paradigms might have been found instead. You might have been using FTP to download TV shows instead of Vuze (oh wait, FTP was invented less than 20 years ago), or be reading this via a gopher client (although the gopher protocol, too, was invented with a patentable term; should companies be paying patent fees on that?)

    That's long winded, but hopefully I've demonstrated that given the speed and conventions of the software industry that the existing patent system _does not_ foster creativity. Copyright and licensing give sufficient protection to inventors of new ideas and protocols. Software patents slows innovation and generally drive the industry to use free alternatives (see, e.g. GIF.)

    Reply

  • andrewcooke

    andrewcooke

    March 10, 2015, 8:01 am

    how will tor help you here? first, there's no encryption to the tor entry point. second if you're going through the neighbour's wifi, they are *before* the tor entry point anyway. with wireshark or whatever it would be trivial to see what was being requested (ie to see the "final" address, as well as the address of the tor node).

    tor is designed to make the *exit* anonymous, not the entry.

    to the original poster - it's trivial for them to look at or log your traffic, and only slightly less trivial to mess you around. they cannot read encrypted (ssl/ssh) traffic without you ignoring a warning of some kind (either from the browser or ssh client), but even then they can still see who you are talking to.

    Reply

  • nigglereddit

    nigglereddit

    March 10, 2015, 10:28 pm

    Actually you've provided the very evidence you pretend to seek - it's you who demanded to be spoon-fed information which is just as available to you as it is to me, and you who claim that the very fact that Dawkins is a scientist makes his claims credible. In fact there's an almost incredible doublethink in your posts, one of the most pronounced I've seen in an atheist. Look at these two quotes, both from you:

    > scientists have no authority, only hypothesis, data, and theory.

    > i said, very very plainly, that an experiment could be devised to find out if his hypothesis was correct

    So you say yourself that a scientist requires data, but immediately say that on Dawkins' point there is no such data. So in what way is it rational to accept Dawkins, a scientist's, idea when scientists require data and no data supports his point?

    Now, be reasonable for a moment. Presumably you consider yourself intelligent. But your reasoning, as I've shown, is broken.

    There's your example of the pathological need of atheists to appeal to authority - your own words, accepting Dawkins' authority without any support at all.

    Reply

  • deus_ex_latino

    deus_ex_latino

    March 11, 2015, 2:54 am

    * 1989 Chevrolet Cavalier, Manual trans, fun to drive despite bring 4-cyl. I used it mainly to deliver pizzas. Super reliable until I blew the head gasket....

    * 1998 Chevrolet S-10 - 4-cyl 0-60 in 2 1/2 mins. manual as well. She was a good truck, still truckin after over 100k miles. had to trade her in for my recent vehicle below

    * 2006 Chevrolet Trailblazer - yes the epitome of douchebaggery :D An SUV. Big vehicle with plenty of space for me to stretch out while driving. plenty of space for my kiddo in the back seat. very secure feeling while driving it. acceleration with the 6 cyl engine is very satisfactory. the folding back seat kinda blows as you will not be able to fold completely flat.

    Reply

  • Phrag

    Phrag

    March 10, 2015, 7:15 am

    Asking for an apology for the things that were wrong is not the same as asking someone to feel guilty for the things they did right. If you feel guilty, that's your personal problem to work out. We celebrate the advancements that these cultures made (including the British), but still want recognition and remembrance of the things that were wrong to assure that they are not repeated and better current relations. For example, most people acknowledge that the Chinese had some very advanced technology very early on, but also condemn the Tienaman Square massacre and treatment of Tibet.

    Reply

  • ssylvan

    ssylvan

    March 11, 2015, 8:42 am

    I think the first one is actually a *good* thing. If you need to do IO deep inside the algorithm you're doing something wrong, and at the very least you should be forced to shuffle things around and state up front what you're doing. If you want to deliberately lie to users of the function, there's always unsafePerformIO. Either way you have to be explicit about what you're doing and not just sweep it under the carpet!

    It would be good if it was a bit more convenient. But I'm not sure I like the idea of effects types which just infers the effects and silently converts your entire program to "effectful" without explicit programmer intent.

    Reply

  • theroguesstash

    theroguesstash

    March 11, 2015, 6:23 am

    A) I got that number from the report Alan Grayson used in the video of him that's popped up on this site. You want to debate it take it up with him, I doubt he'd open himself up to rebuttal by using a study with inflated numbers. And I'm pretty sure that the law you're thinking of applies to medical emergencies in emergency rooms, not chronic conditions where healthcare can be denied or dropped. Aside from that, if the UK can build the NHS after WW2 with most of their infrastructure destroyed from the war, along with their population, then there's no reason we can't do it here without tanking.

    B) They often do, I know because I spent three years of my life trying to become a Paramedic. I had clinical hours in six different services in two states, and had more than enough education involving how both fire and ems run. The money is always taken from someplace else, and other services (like park maintenance) suffer. Also, I really don't give a fuck if you're a self centered asshole who doesn't give a shit about other people around him and doesn't feel the need to be involved in the social contract. For society to work well, you gotta share some times.

    C) Social Security won't be scrapped because it's too popular with the public, and too useful as a piggybank.

    D) Seriously, anybody hiring?

    Reply

  • Random03924803298409

    Random03924803298409

    March 11, 2015, 6:17 am

    I hate it more when they just have a field saying "please enter password" and then you submit

    "your password is too short"

    *make it longer*

    "your password requires letters and numbers"

    *add some numbers*

    "your password requires at least one special character"

    *add an underscore*

    "your password is too long"

    FFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUU

    And then when I want to log in I can't remember which permutation of numbers and characters to add to my standard password.

    Reply

  • munificent

    munificent

    March 10, 2015, 9:10 am

    > because they are bound to a scope and triggered by 'scope exit'.

    Only for stack-allocated objects.

    Of course, you can get similar semantics for heap-allocated objects by defining your own smart pointer class, which destructs (and de-allocates) the object when the pointer goes out of scope.

    But then that only works reliably if your smart pointer is the only pointer to that object. That's too harsh of a limitation in most circumstances, so you end up adding ref counting to your pointer class.

    ...And now you have the circular dependency problem.

    Don't get me wrong, destructors and RAII are pretty nice, but they're still more of a pain to use than GC.

    Reply

  • mollymoo

    mollymoo

    March 10, 2015, 3:01 pm

    Can you still read from it? When flash dies you can still read from it, just not write to it.

    It would be highly unlikely that you've exceeded the write endurance in a couple of days. Lots of tiny writes are hard on flash thanks to write amplification (it has to erase a full block of several hundred KB for every write, no matter how small), but all modern controllers have some kind of wear levelling so you'd still need to do a hell of a lot of writes.

    Assuming typical 100 000 cycle flash, you'd need to write to the same block once per second for 28 hours to wear it out. But you can't write to the same block *on the flash* once per second, because the wear levelling spreads the load, so you'd need to write and erase a significant portion of the drive (how much depends on how good the wear levelling is). You just can't do that in a few days, even working the drive flat out.

    If you got an incredibly cheap drive with some ancient 10 000 cycle flash and a crappy controller with poor or non-existent wear-levelling you could have worn it out. You don't always get what you pay for, but if you pay as little as possible you shouldn't expect much.

    Reply

  • lebski88

    lebski88

    March 10, 2015, 7:24 am

    It's a historical thing. You have to remember that it really wasn't that long ago that different parts of our country didn't just have different accents they spoke different languages. Thousands of years where travel was difficult (not to mention largely pointless for the masses) has resulted in strong regional cultures and dialects. The same is true for a lot of Europe. The USA on the other hand has largely existed in times of easy (easier) travel and has lived much of its history in times of advanced communications. As such these regional dialects are less pronounced.

    Reply

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